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Statement for Under the Wing of Corvus

 

In the summer of 2009 my boys and I noticed a crow seeking shelter under the shrubs in our yard.  After some inventive planning we were able to capture the crow and take it to the Audubon Society. Unfortunately, they realized that the crow would not be able to be rehabilitated.  The experience stayed with me though, and spurred a rash of curiosity about the art, literature, and mythologies of these birds. I soon began to focus my art on the metaphorical imagery associated with these birds.

 

“Under the Wing of Corvus” is a body of work that investigates the concept of myth in our daily lives.  As our technology based, instant messaging culture separates its self from the past, what role does myth play in our lives?  Is there room for such metaphorical thinking?  I believe there is, in fact, I believe the imagery and stories have greater importance than ever.  These narratives serve as reminders of our origins, accentuating the traits that make us human.

 

In this collection of work you will see both literal and abstract representations of myth and literature about Corvus.  Represented here are combinations of specific stories from Haida, Norse, Greek, and Chinese cultures, as well as overarching themes found from many cultures.  “Crow,” by the British poet Ted Hughes was also of great inspiration.  In closing, I would like to leave you this Greek myth about the constellation Corvus:

 

"When Apollo was preparing a feast for Jupiter, the god sent a raven to gather water from a spring.  The raven took a bowl and flew into the air, when it caught sight of fig tree filled with fruit. The raven swooped down, tasted the figs and found they were still unripe. It sat there and waited until the figs were ready, ate its fill, then thought of its duty to the god.  It picked up a water snake and flew back to Apollo, saying that the serpent had blocked the stream.  Apollo saw through the lie, and declared that the raven should henceforth drink no water from a spring until figs have ripened on the trees; that is why the raven speaks with a voice harsh from thirst.  Apollo then placed the raven, bowl and snake in the zodiac to remind people of the bird’s folly."

 

(From “Crow” by Boria Sax)

 

ing we were able to capture the crow and take it to the Audubon Society.  Unfortunately, they realized that the crow would not be able to be rehabilitated.  The experience stayed with me though, and spurred a rash of curiosity about the art, literature, and mythologies of these birds.  I soon began to focus my art on the metaphorical imagery associated with these birds.

“Under the Wing of Corvus” is a body of work that investigates the concept of myth in our daily lives.  As our technology based, instant messaging culture separates its self from the past, what role does myth play in our lives?  Is there room for such metaphorical thinking?  I believe there is, in fact, I believe the imagery and stories have greater importance than ever.  These narratives serve as reminders of our origins, accentuating the traits that make us human.

In this collection of work you will see both literal and abstract representations of myth and literature about Corvus.  Represented here are combinations of specific stories from Haida, Norse, Greek, and Chinese cultures, as well as overarching themes found from many cultures.  “Crow,” by the British poet Ted Hughes was also of great inspiration.  In closing, I would like to leave you this Greek myth about the constellation Corvus:

 

When Apollo was preparing a feast for Jupiter, the god sent a raven to gather water from a spring.  The raven took a bowl and flew into the air, when it caught sight of fig tree filled with fruit. The raven swooped down, tasted the figs and found they were still unripe. It sat there and waited until the figs were ready, ate its fill, then thought of its duty to the god.  It picked up a water snake and flew back to Apollo, saying that the serpent had blocked the stream.  Apollo saw through the lie, and declared that the raven should henceforth drink no water from a spring until figs have ripened on the trees; that is why the raven speaks with a voice harsh from thirst.  Apollo then placed the raven, bowl and snake in the zodiac to remind people of the bird’s folly.

 

(From “Crow” by Boria Sax)